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Prayers for Peacemakers, 13 September 2013

 

Epixel* for 15 September 2013
 You would confound the plans of the poor, but the LORD is their refuge
Psalm 14:6
.
*epixel: a snapshot-epistle to the churches related to and appearing
with a text from the upcoming Sunday's Revised Common Lectionary
readings.

Prayers for Peacemakers, 13 September 2013

Pray that the governing bodies of Canada, New Brunswick, and the Southwestern Energy (SWN) corporation recognize the historic right of the Original Peoples of the Wabanaki-Mi’gmag District of Signigtog to evict SWN from their unceded lands and demand compensation for the damage its operations have caused.

 

Related Stories:

ABORIGINAL JUSTICE: Wabanaki-Mi’gmag District of Signigtog issues historic directive to SWN


ABORIGINAL JUSTICE: "We do not accept the unacceptable" –Elsipogtog First Nation media release


ABORIGINAL JUSTICE: "We do not accept the unacceptable" –Elsipogtog First Nation media release

September 6, 2013 at 1:36pm
Elsipogtog First Nation, New Brunswick

The Original People of the Wabanaki-Mi'gmag District of Signigtog have, for the first time in known history, used their collective authority to stop shale gas activity in New Brunswick.  Based in Elsipogtog, together with allies from Acadian, Anglophone and First Peoples' communities, the Signigtog Grand Council and Collective Community of Concerned Members of Signigtog have issued a directive to shale gas developer Southwestern Energy (SWN) to stop all shale gas activities, leave the territory, and compensate the people for harm caused by their operations.

Kenneth Francis of Signigtog said, “Creator made us caretakers of Mother Earth.  Our goal as the Collective Community of Concerned Members of Signigtog is to protect Mother Earth because we're killing her.  She's already endured too much.  We will lose our clean water if we sit back and allow what the shale gas companies are planning on doing in Signigtog.  What they are planning is unacceptable.  We do not accept the unacceptable.”
…

Directive available here.

ABORIGINAL JUSTICE: Wabanaki-Mi’gmag District of Signigtog issues historic directive to SWN

The Original Peoples of the Wabanaki-Mi’gmag District of Signigtog (of which the Elsipogtog community is a part) asserted their authority over the lands and waterways affected by proposed shale gas exploration by issuing SouthWestern Energy Resources (“SWN”) a Directive on Friday, 30 August 2013.

When European explorers first landed in what is now the Canadian Atlantic Province of New Brunswick, they encountered a vast, multi-faceted nation of aboriginal peoples known collectively as the Mi’gmag.  The Mi’gmag consist of more than a dozen bands, one of which is Elsipogtog First Nation, located in traditional Mi’gmag territory known as Signigtog—or District Six.

The Mi’gmag territory was divided into seven traditional "districts."  Each district had its own independent government and boundaries.  The independent governments had a district chief and a council, or Grand Council.  The district council members were band chiefs, elders, and other community leaders. The district council was in essence an independent government that enacted laws, ran a judicial system, apportioned fishing and hunting grounds, engaged in war and sued for peace.

ABORIGINAL JUSTICE: CPT delegation attends Cecilia Jeffrey Indian Residential School Commemoration gathering


DSCN3526

Imagine a people, devastated by the idea that white society had the right to take native children from their parents.  Imagine a government using these malnourished children as test subjects in nutritional experiments.  This history is the truth of the Indian Residential School system and what we learned on the site of Cecilia Jeffrey, once a Presbyterian-run Residential School.

Starting in the nineteenth Century, the government took native children in Canada away from their families and sent them to Roman Catholic, Protestant, and Mennonite Residential Schools.  School administrators gave them different names, forbade them to speak their own language, and did not allow them to see their parents.

ABORIGINAL JUSTICE: Join delegation to sovereign Elsipogtog First Nation 27 September - 7 October 2013

From time immemorial, the peoples of the sovereign Mi’kmaq territory of Signigtog have lived upon their traditional lands with their own governments, political systems, language, culture, spirituality, and diverse means of livelihood.  They have never surrendered their sovereignty or jurisdiction over their lands.



In 1701, the British Crown began to sign Peace and Friendship Treaties with the Mi'kmaq, Maliseet, Passamaquoddy, and Penobscot First Peoples to end hostilities and encourage cooperation between the British and First Peoples.  The Peace and Friendship Treaties recognize Aboriginal sovereignty and title to the lands they traditionally use and occupy.  What is now called Crown Land in the Province of New Brunswick is unceded land and subject to Mi’kmaq jurisdiction.

On 14 May 2012, the Band Council of Elsipogtog First Nation, a Mi'kmaq community, passed a resolution opposing shale gas exploration and development within Elsipogtog First Nation and the Province of New Brunswick, citing concerns about the environment and the need for direct consultation by the Crown.  On 30 May 2013, the Mi'kmaq Grand Council of the Signigtog District 6 issued a public notice prohibiting all “shale gas exploration and/or development” without the “expressed written consent and full participation of the Mi'kmaq Grand Council and the Mi'kmaq people of the Signigtog District.”

This delegation will replace the delegation originally scheduled to go to Grassy Narrows during these dates.

FUNDRAISING EXPECTATION: $625 (Cdn or USD). Delegates arrange and pay for their own transportation to  Moncton, New Brunswick, Canada.

Click here to apply.