Recent CPTnet stories

ABORIGINAL JUSTICE REFLECTION: Finding the Church’s place 250 years after the Royal Proclamation.

Three years ago in Algonquin territory, an elder of Barriere Lake taught me about the Three Figure Agreement wampum belt.  It displays a trio of human figures; French, English and Algonquin, standing hand-in-hand beside the unmistakable form of the cross. “Some folks get angry when they see that cross” said the elder through his translator. “But I tell them why it’s there: because the Church promised to make sure that the Europeans kept their promises.”

As a Christian aiming to live and work in solidarity with the First Peoples of this land, I find it hard to ignore the Church’s history of abuse and betrayal as it collaborated with the colonial project.  Discerning how to be a faithful Christian given that knowledge is a challenge.  

Recently I accompanied a delegation of First Nation chiefs, elders & veterans to London, capital of my UK homeland, a city built on the spoils of Empire and cluttered with colonial mementos and monuments. A number of other Christians of both native and non-native heritage joined the delegation to mark 250 years since the Royal Proclamation of 1763 that set the stage for treaty-making.  In discussions, the role of the Church in these treaties became clearer to me.

Indigenous nations had long-established forms and traditions for international treaty-making, but the British government did not adopt a consistent policy regarding treaties until the Royal Proclamation.

 The Church’s significance for Indigenous negotiators can be emphasised by considering different interpretations of “treaty”—the European understanding of them as surrender of land, and the Indigenous conception as a relationship for mutual sharing of lands, technology and gifts. If a treaty is covenant, not land surrender, the spiritual dimension is central, and the Church’s presence must have reassured negotiators that these newcomers understood what they were committing to.

Elsipogtog: An Ugly Day in New Brunswick

Thursday 17 October was an "ugly day in the history of the province of New Brunswick,” according to Mi'kmaq Chief Arren Sock as he prepared to meet with Premier David Alward the following day.

At approximately 6 AM, the RCMP broke the blockade of vehicles owned by SWN Resources parked in a compound near Rexton, New Brunswick. The Mi’kmaq of Elsipogtog First Nation, together with their Acadian and Anglophone allies, kept the gate blockaded for 19 days, even in the face of a court injunction acquired by the US-based company doing seismic testing for the presence of shale gas.

ABORIGINAL JUSTICE: Elsipogtog: Patience is a virtue

ABORIGINAL JUSTICE: Elsipogtog: Patience is a virtue

Standing at the BlockadeEntering its second week, the blockade at the Southwestern Energy Resources (SWN) “thumper” compound on Route 134 near Rexton, New Brunswick shows no signs of ending.

First Peoples from Elsipogtog and other communities, as well as Acadian and Anglophone protectors, make up the encampment. CPTers Chris Sabas and Carrie Peters also remain within the encampment, enjoying brief respites off site thanks to the generosity of local community members. Donated food and supplies continue to arrive at the encampment.

Elsipogtog: Blockade Begins

On Sunday, 29 September 2013, Elsipogtog women protectors blocked the entrance to a recently constructed compound housing Southwestern Energy Resources Canada (SWN) equipment on local Highway 134, near present-day Rexton, New Brunswick.  The compound is located on Elsipogtog traditional territory, which is unceded land.

Within minutes they were joined by other indigenous protectors, as well as Acadian and Anglophone community members. The Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) attempted to re-secure the entrance to the compound, but the unarmed protectors successfully stood their ground. An encampment was erected. At the time of this release, the blockade has entered its fifth day. All SWN property within the compound remains untouched and unmolested.

Aboriginal Justice: Breaking News - CPT invited to accompany delegation to Britain

Indigenous and faith leaders in Canada have invited Christian Peacemaker Teams (CPT) to accompany a delegation to Britain from 2-9 October, 2013, marking the Royal Proclamation of 1763.

The Proclamation of King George III was an attempt following the Seven Year's War to set policy for the new British territories in North America. The proclamation is significant for recognising a form of territorial sovereignty for First Peoples, including the Crown's need to secure consent for future settlement or expansion.

Although the Canadian Constitution recognises “existing aboriginal and treaty rights,” the government continues to neglect the need for consent for projects affecting First Nations peoples, contributing to widespread land-rights violations.

In the United States, the protection from predatory settlement offered by the Royal Proclamation was one of the causes for the American Revolution, as settlers broke away from imperial Britain to pursue expansion unfettered by agreements with the First Peoples.

Mi'kmaq campaigners involved in the current resistance to shale gas extraction recently referenced the Royal Proclamation in an official request for the Queen's intervention. The team will support this call, and connect with UK anti-fracking campaigners.

#GIVINGTUESDAY It was important that CPT was able to send representatives on short notice after it received the invitation from indigenous leaders.  We need to have a reserve of funds so that we can respond to requests such as these.  They go a long way toward building alliances and trust.

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