Recent CPTnet stories

Las Pavas writes to President Santos regarding continued attacks on their community

The Farmers Association of Buenos Aires (ASOCAB) yesterday delivered a letter to President Juan Manuel Santos summarizing the continued attacks and threats received by the community of Las Pavas.  They appealed to him,  â€śMr. President, you have shown your commitment to victims.  By virtue of this commitment we come to you, with the hope that the State would indeed act in our favor and avoid the repetition of incidents that victimize us.”

The community restates their commitment to “peacefully insisting”— despite attacks by palm oil company, Aportes San Isidro´s armed security—that the law provides the means to their complete ownership and right to the land.  In spite of winning the National Peace Prize in November and being re-recognized by the government agency that manages  reparations to victims, Unidad Nacional de AtenciĂłn y ReparaciĂłn Integral a las VĂ­ctimas, the attacks and threats against the community continue.

As recently as 6 March, at 7.15 pm, under the cover of complete darkness,  the palm oil company’s guards threw bricks into the living areas of homes and onto roofs, creating dents.

 

See reflection on the damage caused by the palm oil industry written by Parwen Aziz, who is currently participating in the Christian Peacemaker Team training in Iraqi Kurdistan.

COLOMBIA: Apply now for CPT Colombia’s Organized Labour Delegation 17-31 May


Our May delegation should be especially appealing to those involved in organized labour.  Colombia continues to be the most dangerous place on earth for trade unionists.  Participants in this delegation will meet with public and private sector union leaders, as well as organized informal sector self-employed workers.  Activists in all three groups are threatened because of their efforts to protect workers’ rights and livelihoods.

Participants will also spend some time in north-east Antioquia—the state/province hardest hit by anti-labor violence—where they will be hosted by our partner, human rights organization CAHUCOPANA, and learn about its grassroots struggle to promote and defend the human rights of campesino farmers, artisanal miners, and organized labour.

Participants will also learn about how the Canadian and U.S. “free trade” agreements with Colombia have adversely affected Colombian and North American workers’ rights.

Apply now!  Share this information with your coworkers!  Help protect your own jobs and stop the wage race to the bottom, which causes the brutal repression of Colombian rights and those of other workers in the global workforce.  Get your own labour union involved by sponsoring representatives for this delegation.




 

 

 

 

Help us promote this delegation by downloading, printing, and posting posters at your place of work, play, recreation, or worship:


 
POSTER
 
POSTER ALTPOSTER ALT
POSTER ALT
 
The posters can be printed in Black and White if you do not have access to a colour printerfor more info email delegations@cpt.org

Prayers for Peacemakers, March 5, 2014

Prayers for Peacemakers, March 5, 2014

Pray for the community of Guayabo, Colombia, which successfully resisted an eviction in November, but still fears the intervention of illegal outside armed actors.

Erik Yesid Payares, 32, a leader for the community of Guayabo, asked CPT’s Colombia team to publicize the following request this week:  â€śIt is important to us that this problem is made known.  We are humble people of peace and small farmers.  We live in a critical situation under threat.  We ask that you help us and not abandon us.”’

 

Epixel* for 9 March 2014

if you offer your food to the hungry and satisfy the needs of the afflicted,
then your light shall rise in the darkness and your gloom be like the noonday.
Isaiah 58:10

*epixel: a snapshot-epistle to the churches related to and appearing with a text from
the upcoming Sunday's Revised Common Lectionary readings.

COLOMBIA: Displaced leader returns to community

On Friday January 10th, Salvador Alcántara, pastor and leader for the community of El Garzal and Nueva Esperanza, and his family returned to their home.  Paramilitary threats forced pastor Salvador and his family to leave El Garzal in June of 2013.

After 7 difficult months away from family and church community, Salvador glowed with joy as he and his family unloaded boxes and swept away cobwebs.  â€śI am thrilled to be home” he said over dinner with his children and grandchildren,  â€śnow I really feel free”

COLOMBIA REFLECTION: A Christmas Vigil in El Garzal

Vigil at El Garzal

It was a Christmas perhaps more akin to that first one in Bethlehem than the ones I am used to in Canada. No fancy lights—no electricity except for a diesel generator that gets used occasionally at night. No Christmas tree, nor gifts under it. No alcohol. No turkey. And, thankfully, without the cacophony of extremely loud music around our house here in Barrancabermeja, where neighbours set up humongous competing sound systems in front of their houses to celebrate the season.

Our main reason for visiting was to accompany Garzal's twice-displaced leader and pastor, Reverend Salvador Alcántara and his family, so they could spend Christmas with family and loved ones in Garzal. Salvador and his family had to leave the area again last May because of death threats. They miss Garzal very very much! Salvador described the feeling of being back, albeit for only three days, as like being re-born.