Recent CPTnet stories

Prayers for Peacemakers, November 6, 2014

Prayers for Peacemakers, November 6, 2014 

Give thanks for the work of CPT Mediterranean, which recently completed its summer presence on the Greek Island of Lesvos.  Participants in the Mediterranean project made migrants and refugees feel welcome and advocated for more humane European Union immigration policies.

               Epixel* for Sunday November 9, 2014
                                          Party to celebrate time in Lesvos
But let justice roll down like waters, and righteousness
like an everflowing stream.  Amos 5:24
 *epixel: a snapshot-epistle to the churches related to and appearing with a text from
the upcoming Sunday's 
 
Revised  Common Lectionary  readings.

UNITED STATES REFLECTION: Voting for peace

Yesterday, I was calling old friends and letting them know I’d be in town to talk about my work with Christian Peacemaker Teams. One friend asked me how I like my new work in comparison with the political organizing I used to do. I didn’t need to stop and think; the answer was easy. Working to gather votes for this issue or that candidate, I had feelings of emptiness and inevitability. Now, I love being able to apply my expertise, energy, and passion to peacemaking, to resistance work that feeds my soul. 

 

 
 Palestine team member stands with children on
street and monitors soldiers' treatment of
13-year-old boy
 

Today, I woke up and reached for my phone. What I saw was a newsfeed flooded with rage, sadness, even despair. I remember those post-election nights and days from my previous career. When the first issue campaign I worked on lost, I cried more than a few bitter tears.  

When I woke up today, though, my emotional state was not connected to election results beyond passing feelings of hope and disappointment.  I woke up with energy and conviction to resist violence, oppression, and injustice for another day. It’s not that it doesn’t matter to me whether it’s politician A or B with their hands in the gears of the U.S. system.  Decisions made in the U.S. impact the bodies and lives of people and communities in the States and around the world.  It’s that now I’ve joined with so many in the active, concrete work of ongoing peacemaking.  And CPT, standing with our partners to transform violence and oppression, was resisting yesterday, is resisting today, and will be resisting tomorrow. 

Peacemakers, activists, resisters of injustice, whatever your feelings about today’s elections results: you can join today in our transformative peacemaking work. Vote for peace today by investing in the work of CPT. Thanks to you, members of CPT stand in solidarity with partners in peaceful transformative resistance every day in Palestine, Iraqi Kurdistan, Colombia, and Canada, no matter the U.S. election results any given November Tuesday.

Please make a donation today - over 80% of our income comes from donors like you.  

EUROPE: Migrants on their journey--dilemmas and possible solutions

On a daily basis, hundreds of migrants try to get into Europe through different routes-- mainly via smugglers.  Most of the migrants are struggling to find either a safe life without persecution or have better standards of life to support their families at home.  The routes and the facilitators of the journey that they choose are the least safe options ever to exist.

Often the suggested solution focuses on ways to block the smugglers’ routes.  European authorities should identify and crack down on smugglers’ networks.  However, the story is not going to end as long as migrants face onerous restrictions for getting into Europe.

People are trying the illegal routes because they mostly have no legal way to get in.  As a result, the migrants become victims of crimes like torture and raping meted out by smugglers and tragedies like drowning in the sea on the way. 

The migrant population is divided into two different main groups: economic migrants and asylum seekers.  Economic migrants leave their home countries to work and support their families at home like many Greeks in the other European countries at the moment.  The asylum seekers are the ones who are running away from wars, conflict zones, persecution, torture, and other serious threats forcing them to seek a safer life, usually in the West.

Obviously, the asylum seekers are supposed to get benefits that economic migrants do not.  However, it is not easy to differentiate between asylum seekers and economic migrants because almost everybody who gets into Europe lodges an asylum application, because it is the only chance to get a legal status.  On the other hand, it has become much more difficult for the real asylum seekers to prove their stories.

All over the world, we find westerners working or living in another country merely because of their curiosity to explore the world.  The United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights emphasizes that everyone has the right to move freely, leave any country and return.  So far, it has been enforced for the citizens of western countries and the eastern families with money, not equally for everyone. 

AL-KHALIL (HEBRON): Israeli military arrests two boys, eleven and thirteen, in Hebron

On Sunday, 26 October at approximately 7:45 a.m., Israeli border police detained and arrested an eleven-year-old Palestinian boy in the Qitoun area of H2 (under full Israeli military control) during the morning school patrol. 

The Israeli soldier grabbed the young boy by wrapping his hand in the collar of his shirt and twisting his clothing tightly around the neck, despite the fact that the young Palestinian showed no signs of resisting.

After several minutes of Palestinian adults pleading with the soldier to release his grip, the soldier finally responded and escorted him to the police station next to the Ibrahimi Mosque without notifying his parents.

The boy remained at the police station for over an hour and a half, after which the soldier informed one of the schoolteachers that police would hand him over to the Palestinian Authority at Check Point 56 at Bab iZaweyya, in the H1 section of Hebron.  Once the child was in the military jeep by himself, instead of taking him to Checkpoint 56, the Israeli soldiers transported him to the other side of Hebron to the police station at the Israeli settlement* of Kiryat Arba. 

IRAQI KURDISTAN: Survivor of ISIS massacre tells story to Christian Peacemaker Teams

 

 
 Ezidi families fleeing massacres have taken refuge in unfinished buildings

ISIS invaded Aswad’s village Kocho on 10 August 2014.  They militants insisted that all the Ezidis (Yazidis) in the village convert to Islam or die.  When they refused, ISIS gathered around a thousand people in the school.  They took villagers’ phones, money, and jewelry.  Then, ISIS took the men and drove them in three trucks several hundred meters from the main road.  There, they knocked them to the ground and shot them with machine guns, and then shot them each in the head to make sure he was dead.  When it was Aswad’s turn, the executioner heard planes approaching and ran away, leaving Aswad in agony, with four bullets in his pelvis and legs.  The rest of the men died on the spot, except three men who ran away wounded, and who, as Aswad learned, ISIS later found and killed. 

Aswad, a man in his forties, believes that his inability to walk or run saved his life.  Crawling in pain, hunger, and thirst, after about five hours, he reached the nearest village (around 2km away).  Fearing ISIS’s revenge, the villagers threw Aswad out of the village on a blanket and abandoned him.  However, in the darkness of the night, a teenager from the village came to him, brought him water, and let Aswad borrow his phone.  Aswad called his friend who, with a much fear and hesitation, came to help him.  His friend kept hiding him, as he lay delirious with a high fever, in poultry farms and in an abandoned house.