CPTnet

CPTnet is the news service of CPT, providing daily news updates, reports, reflections, prayer requests and action alerts.

AL-KHALIL (HEBRON): Revenge devoid of purposeā€”punitive demolitions of Palestinian homes


 If Israelā€™s assault on Gaza this summer has been blind, primal violence on a macro scale, the demolition of three Palestinian apartment blocks in Hebron during the early hours of 18 August 2014ā€”punitive retaliation against the suspected culprits in the kidnapping of three Israeli youth in Juneā€”represented pointless violence and suffering on a micro scale.  Yet that micro event, multiplied thousands of times over the days, weeks and years of occupation, adds up to what has been called ā€œincremental genocideā€ in the sense of destroying a culture and its ability to survive.

Between 2001-2005, according to Bā€™tselem figures, Israel demolished 664 Palestinian homes as forms of punishment.*  These demolitions displaced 4,182 innocent people, many of them neighbors of the suspectā€™s family, and occurred often on the basis of suspicion alone.

Hussam al-Qawasmi house (Photo: Yousef Natsheh)

ABORIGINAL JUSTICE: Anishinabe and allies send clear ā€˜No Pipelineā€™ message to TransCanada

n 12 August 2014, Anishinabek women, accompanied by local allies and a CPT delegation, led a community rejection of the planned Energy East pipeline, delivering a clear 'no' to the project, the company TransCanada, and the materialist, extractivist* culture that prioritises wealth generation over clean water, protecting the climate, and future generations. 

Led by children, mothers, and grandmothers holding signs and drumming, the group entered an open house, TransCanada was holding at the Lakeside Inn in Kenora, Ontario.  Speaking directly to the company representatives to make their refusal clear, several spoke of corporationā€™s failure to engage the women in their role as Anishinabe Waterkeepers.  As well as addressing the crowd, the group also prayed and sang songs to honour the water threatened by the pipeline. 

Anishinabek waterkeepers, prior to entering TransCanada's open house

Prayers for Peacemakers, August 20, 2014

Prayers for Peacemakers, August 20, 2014

Pray for migrant and refugee children who come to Greece without their parents.  Even if they have a family member with them, the authorities separate them if that family member is not a parent.  Last week, volunteers working on the Mediterranean Project that CPT Europe supports spoke with a twelve to thirteen year old Afghan boy who was crying because the authorities were going to hold him for a longer period by himself in the Moria Detention Center, even though he had been traveling with an aunt. 

Epixel* for Sunday, August 24, 2014
Moria Detention Centre on Island of Lesvos, Greece

When she opened it, she saw the child.  He was crying, and she took pity on him, "This must be
 one of the Hebrews' children," she said. 
Exodus 2:6

*epixel: a snapshot-epistle to the churches related to and appearing with a text from the upcoming Sunday's Revised Common Lectionary readings.


IRAQI KURDISTAN NEWS ACTION: Civil Society Organizations' Urgent Call to the Int'l Community--HELP THE DISPLACED YAZIDI PEOPLE FROM SHANGAL

HELP THE DISPLACED YAZIDI PEOPLE FROM SHANGAL: CIVIL SOCIETY ORGANIZATIONSā€™ URGENT CALL TO THE INTERNATIONAL COMMUNITY

Representatives of three human rights non-governmental organizations (NGOs), a German-Kurdish organization Wadi, a North American-based international organization Christian Peacemaker Teams (CPT), and Duhok-based Alind Organization, conducted a two day visit on 15 and 16 August 2014 to areas in the Duhok Governorate of Iraqi Kurdistan where Yazidi Iraqis who fled the violence of the Islamic State (IS) forces from the Shangal (Sinjar) area are now staying.  The representatives spoke with an official at the Peshabur (Faysh Khabur) Iraqi-Syrian border crossing, who estimated that since 5 August more than 100,000 people have entered seeking refuge.out their future.  The majority of the interviewees said they feared to stay in Iraq and wanted to emigrate to Europe, the U.S.A., or Canada.

The representatives observed Yazidi families camping out under makeshift tents along the roads throughout the area, under highway overpass bridges, or in the open sided concrete buildings under construction.  They visited the displacement camp for an estimated 2,000 people (no official numbers given) in the Khanke municipality near the town of Semel, and the Bajet Kandala Refugee Camp, near the Peshabur crossing.  At these camps, they spoke with over fifty displaced persons.  Those interviewed shared many common experiences.  Families reported men in their family killed and women raped or kidnapped by IS forces, escaping to Mount Shangal, watching relatives die for lack of food and water and suffering extreme heat exposure.  They appeared deeply traumatized, and spoke of shame and despair about their future.  The majority of the interviewees said they feared to stay in Iraq and wanted to emigrate to Europe, the U.S.A., or Canada.

COLOMBIA REFLECTION: My hero


The first time I met my hero she was one of a dozen dusty, carefree children congregated like a school of fish on the edge of town as they dreamed up their next adventure.  Buenos Aires looked like of the best places on earth to be a kid: a small, quiet riverside town with a whole jungle out back to explore, where they were free to be queens and kings of their own destiny. 

It was a warning to me that singled her out from this mob of Indiana Joneses: ā€œThat one over thereā€”the angelic, sweet, little girl with the springy curls and big smile?  Sheā€™s a handful.  Give her a foot and sheā€™ll take a mile.ā€ 

Jimena sure is a handfulā€”a handful of spunk, spirit, and joy.  Sheā€™s nine years old and she wants to be a doctor when she grows up to help people with heart problems.  Her toothy grin and the way she snuggles up under my arm and into my heart leaves me no doubt that sheā€™ll save many lives.