CPTnet

CPTnet is the news service of CPT, providing daily news updates, reports, reflections, prayer requests and action alerts.

 

IRAQI KURDISTAN: September 2016 newsletter--the people resist the government’s corruption

 

 

September 2016
 
 
 

Iraqi Kurdistan

 
Demonstrations in Iraqi Kurdistan
I demand that my life and my family's lives be saved 
CPT Iraqi Kurdistan Team
Hemn Bnaslawayi at CPT house. Photo by: Julie Brown.
It was around 6:30 when Asaish security forces suddenly arrived at Hemin’s home in Erbil.  They were in official cars with logos. As the security forces began to pull Hemn from the premises his fifteen year old son began to shout and ask why they were taking his father.  It was then that an officer punched Hemin’s son in the face and arrested him.  The officers also became physical with his pregnant wife. The officers put a bag over Hemin’s head and forced him into their car while they beat his son and put him into a different car.

Read the full report here

Prayers for Peacemakers, October 12, 2016

Prayers for Peacemakers, October 12, 2016

Give thanks for seven new CPTers who recently completed training in the Czech Republic and the fresh energy they will bring to teams working in the field. Pray for their strength and wisdom as they join our Indigenous, Palestinian, Kurdish, and Colombian partners and partners working with refugees and migrants to transform violence through the nonviolent power of God’s truth.

 

*Epixel for Peacemakers  October 16, 2016 
The LORD is your keeper; the LORD is your shade at your right hand.
The sun shall not strike you by day, nor the moon by night.
The LORD will keep you from all evil; he will keep your life.
The LORD will keep your going out and your coming in from this time on and forevermore. Psalm 121:5-8
 
*epixel: a snapshot-epistle to the churches related to and appearing  with a text from the upcoming Sunday's Revised Common Lectionary  readings

COLOMBIA: Colombians reject peace deal. Why and what next?

 

A woman looks for her identification number on a chart at a local voting station in Barrancabermeja. (CPT/Caldwell Manners)

Nine days have passed since the 2 October referendum when 6,431,376 Colombians voted to reject the peace agreement between the government and the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia-People’s Army (FARC-EP). The slim win of the “No” vote, by a margin of 54,000, leaves the country in a highly polarized state.

On September 26 with the whole world watching, President Juan Manuel Santos quoted the national anthem, “The horrible night has ceased,” after signing the 297-page peace agreement with the FARC. The signing set at the historic city of Cartagena with heads of state and dignitaries from fifteen countries present was a symbolic and powerful move to sway a divided country to vote in favor of the agreement. In 2013, Santos proposed a referendum in hopes to seal the agreement with a public show of confidence. He promised a simple “Sí” or  “No” question—“Do you support the final agreement to end the conflict and the construction of a stable and long-lasting peace?” The country would take on the responsibility to ratify the agreement. It didn’t work.

CPT INTERNATIONAL: CPT Seeks Psychosocial Care Coordinator

 

Christian Peacemaker Teams (CPT) is accepting expressions of interest for the full-time position of: Psychosocial Care Coordinator.  

 Team: Independent Consultant accountable to CPT’s Administrative Team

Reports to Program Director

Terms: Independent Consultant, full-time, 40 hours/week, three-year appointment

Compensation: to be negotiated

Location: flexible; international travel required

Start Date: 1 December 2016

Application Deadline: 30 October 2016 

Please send resumé and statement of motivation to program@cpt.org. Full job description available upon request. 

MEDITERRANEAN: My first working day in Pipka—the love letter

 

English lessons were slow getting started. Peggy walked around the camp by the cabins and tents to let interested refugees know the session would soon begin. Lunch finished late, but soon two young women showed up, Farsi-speakers, maybe sisters. 

Peggy had been teaching for a few days now. I was there to observe her technique. Soon a man joined us, possibly around thirty years old, Pakistani. He had a shy manner, and was hesitant to approach, but he emitted a kind of indefinable radiance. He asked me if I could help him with “deep” words. At first, I thought he wanted to talk philosophy, but, no, he wanted words that had to do with feelings, specifically words to do with love. 

“Love,” though was to simple a word for what he had in mind. And he wanted, as it turned out, full sentences:

“You are profoundly beautiful.”

“My heart is full of affection for you.”

“I adore you.” 

It became quickly clear to me that he wanted to compose a love letter. He had met a Pakistani-American woman here on Lesvos and been on a couple of dates.  Now he wanted to express how he felt about her: