Advent Candle Readings & Bulletin Notes

November 28, 2010 First Sunday in Advent: Candle of Hope

God of light, who came into a world of darkness and who has never left it, we invite you to be present in the lighting of this candle.

This candle, known as the Candle of Prophesy or Hope, remembers especially the hope that was brought into the world by the prophetic words that told of the Christ.

There is so much hope in the promise of a child that is not yet born. This hope is the beating heart of the Christmas story, a hope for salvation, justice and right relationship with God.

This world needs hope. In the absence of justice:

Indigenous children are taken from their families and communities. The cases of murdered and missing Indigenous women are not adequately investigated. Mercury poisoning is passed from mother to child.

But these women and children also nurture the spirit and will to pursue justice. Some have rekindled hope by leading their communities in protecting their land. Others have walked thousands of kilometres to bring their messages to the government. How can we honour the hope that they bring? What prophetic hope can we offer, in our words and deeds, of a better future for all?

The candle flame that burns here represents the presence of Christ in a dark world. Let us honour that fire that burns within us, the longing for justice and healing.

 

First Sunday in Advent: Bulletin Insert

On September 13, 2007 the UN General Assembly adopted the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. This followed more than twenty years of discussions within the UN system. Indigenous representatives played key roles in the development of this Declaration.

There are over 370 million Indigenous peoples in Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe and the Pacific. They are among the most impoverished, marginalised and frequently victimised people in the world

The United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples is celebrated globally as a symbol of triumph and hope. Effective implementation of the Declaration would result in significant improvements in the global situation of Indigenous peoples.

-Ad Hoc Coalition on the UN Declaration

The 46 Articles address specific violations committed against Indigenous communities and individuals. Each article reflects a painful reality for Indigenous people. Each article is a redress of an established wrong.

 

According to Article 22.2 of the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples: “States shall take measures, in conjunction with indigenous peoples, to ensure that indigenous women and children enjoy the full protection and guarantees against all forms of violence and discrimination.”

Recognising that there exists specific and targeted violence towards indigenous women and children in the US and Canada today, a vital, faithful and prophetic response is to call on the government to implement the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.

CANADA - Take action: http://www.kairoscanada.org/en/take-action/the-land-our-life/kairos-day-of-action-december-5/december-5th-beat-the-drum-action-update/

US - Take action: http://takeaction.amnestyusa.org/siteapps/advocacy/index.aspx?c=jhKPIXPCIoE&b=2590179&template=x.ascx&action=14586

 

 

December 5, 2010 - Second Sunday of Advent: Candle of Preparation

God of light, who came into a world of darkness and who has never left it, we invite you to be present in the lighting of this candle.

This candle, known as the Candle of Preparation or The Way remembers the necessity of repentance for a right relationship with God and our neighbour.

Repentance is turning back to God when we have gone astray.

The churches went astray when they tried to make indigenous children more like non-Native children in residential and day schools. Children were punished for speaking their languages and were told their culture and spirituality were evil.

What does it mean to repent? What can we do as individuals and as a church to “bear fruit that befits repentance” in respect to our indigenous neighbours?

The candle flame that burns here represents the presence of Christ in a dark world. Let us honour that fire that burns within us, the longing for justice and healing.

 

Second Sunday in Advent: Bulletin Insert

On September 13, 2007 the UN General Assembly adopted the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. This followed more than twenty years of discussions within the UN system. Indigenous representatives played key roles in the development of this Declaration.

There are over 370 million Indigenous peoples in Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe and the Pacific. They are among the most impoverished, marginalised and frequently victimised people in the world

The United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples is celebrated globally as a symbol of triumph and hope. Effective implementation of the Declaration would result in significant improvements in the global situation of Indigenous peoples.

-Ad Hoc Coalition on the UN Declaration

The 46 Articles address specific violations committed against Indigenous communities and individuals. Each article reflects a painful reality for Indigenous people. Each article is a redress of an established wrong.

 

According to Article 7.2 of the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples: Indigenous peoples have the collective right to live in freedom, peace and security as distinct peoples and shall not be subjected to any act of genocide or any other act of violence, including forcibly removing children of the group to another group.

Recognising that cultural genocide through the practice of assimilation is an historical and current reality in the US and Canada, a vital, faithful and prophetic response is to call on the government to implement the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.

CANADA - Take action: http://www.kairoscanada.org/en/take-action/the-land-our-life/kairos-day-of-action-december-5/december-5th-beat-the-drum-action-update/

US - Take action: http://takeaction.amnestyusa.org/siteapps/advocacy/index.aspx?c=jhKPIXPCIoE&b=2590179&template=x.ascx&action=14586

 

December 12, 2010 - Third Sunday of Advent: Candle of Joy

God of light, who came into a world of darkness and who has never left it, we invite you to be present in the lighting of this candle

This candle, known as the Candle of Joy, remembers the promise of balance restored and all things made new.

John the Baptist jumped for joy in his mother's womb. Later when he was in prison he needed Jesus to remind him that prophecies of justice and healing were being fulfilled all around him.

Healing and renewal often come through the distinctive spiritual relationship Indigenous women and men have with the land, and their responsibility to future generations.

How might we, by upholding the rights of indigenous peoples, participate in the fulfilment of prophecy?

The candle flame that burns here represents the presence of Christ in a dark world. Let us honour that fire that burns within us, the longing for justice and healing.

 

Third Sunday in Advent: Bulletin Insert

On September 13, 2007 the UN General Assembly adopted the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. This followed more than twenty years of discussions within the UN system. Indigenous representatives played key roles in the development of this Declaration.

There are over 370 million Indigenous peoples in Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe and the Pacific. They are among the most impoverished, marginalised and frequently victimised people in the world

The United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples is celebrated globally as a symbol of triumph and hope. Effective implementation of the Declaration would result in significant improvements in the global situation of Indigenous peoples.

 -Ad Hoc Coalition on the UN Declaration

The 46 Articles address specific violations committed against Indigenous communities and individuals. Each article reflects a painful reality for Indigenous people. Each article is a redress of an established wrong.

 

According to Article 25 of the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples: “Indigenous peoples have the right to maintain and strengthen their distinctive spiritual relationship with their traditionally owned or otherwise occupied and used lands, territories, waters and coastal seas and other resources and to uphold their responsibilities to future generations in this regard.”

Recognising that it is in everyone's best interest that Indigenous peoples are legally entitled to protect their traditional lands, a vital, faithful and prophetic response is to call on the government to implement the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.

CANADA - Take action: http://www.kairoscanada.org/en/take-action/the-land-our-life/kairos-day-of-action-december-5/december-5th-beat-the-drum-action-update/

US - Take action: http://takeaction.amnestyusa.org/siteapps/advocacy/index.aspx?c=jhKPIXPCIoE&b=2590179&template=x.ascx&action=14586

 

December 19, 2010 - Fourth Sunday of Advent: Candle of Peace

God of light, who came into a world of darkness and who has never left it, we invite you to be present in the lighting of this candle.

This candle is called the Candle of Peace or Love. At Christmas time we celebrate the God of Love who came to Earth as the Prince of Peace. If we are inspired by love, let us be the peacemakers that Jesus calls the children of God.

The absence of direct violence is not the same as the presence of peace. Peace is denied when resources are unequally distributed and access to power is a privilege given to only a few. Violence can be committed against communities, cultures and the earth itself, and all of these acts impact  people whom God has created and loves.

In this season, while we celebrate the loving Emmanuel, the God Who Is With Us, let us manifest God's peace-making love as we recognize God's spirit in our Indigenous neighbours. Indigenous communities have lost and continue to lose land and resources. Non-Natives continue to prosper from stolen lands and resources. The path of peace is the path of mutuality and recompense. To live justly is to insist that the people in power who represent us stop taking or selling what does not belong to them. To make peace is to insist that those who have lost their lands and livelihoods be adequately compensated.

The candle flame that burns here represents the presence of Christ in a dark world. Let us honour that fire that burns within us, the longing for justice and healing.

 

Fourth Sunday of Advent: Bulletin Insert

On September 13, 2007 the UN General Assembly adopted the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. This followed more than twenty years of discussions within the UN system. Indigenous representatives played key roles in the development of this Declaration.

There are over 370 million Indigenous peoples in Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe and the Pacific. They are among the most impoverished, marginalised and frequently victimised people in the world

The United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples is celebrated globally as a symbol of triumph and hope. Effective implementation of the Declaration would result in significant improvements in the global situation of Indigenous peoples.

-Ad Hoc Coalition on the UN Declaration

The 46 Articles address specific violations committed against Indigenous communities and individuals. Each article reflects a painful reality for Indigenous people. Each article is a redress of an established wrong.

 

According to Article 28.1 of the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples: “Indigenous peoples have the right to redress, by means that can include restitution or, when this is not possible, just, fair and equitable compensation, for the lands, territories and resources which they have traditionally owned or otherwise occupied or used, and which have been confiscated, taken, occupied, used or damaged without their free, prior and informed consent.”

Recognising that Indigenous communities are disadvantaged by government and corporate refusal to consult them on issues that directly impact their land and also by their refusal to compensate for damage done to traditional economies through resource extraction like logging and mining, a vital, faithful and prophetic response is to call on the government to implement the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.

CANADA - Take action: http://www.kairoscanada.org/en/take-action/the-land-our-life/kairos-day-of-action-december-5/december-5th-beat-the-drum-action-update/

US - Take action:  http://takeaction.amnestyusa.org/siteapps/advocacy/index.aspx?c=jhKPIXPCIoE&b=2590179&template=x.ascx&action=14586

 

December 25, 2010 – Christmas Day: Christ Candle

God of light, who came into a world of darkness and who has never left it, we invite you to be present in the lighting of this candle.

This candle, the Christ Candle, represents Jesus, the Light of the World. The coming of  the Messiah was heralded by prophets and angels. It was read in the stars by the Magi and longed for by the priests of the temple.

The nativity story is just as remarkable after two millennia, yet it is easier today to see the miracles and  wonder without seeing the poverty, pain and oppression that Jesus was born into. The context is just as much a part of the nativity as the content.

If Jesus were born today into an Indigenous community how would we relate to him or recognize him? How would we celebrate his birth and what gifts might we bring him? How far do we have to go, how much do we need to learn and unlearn before we are ready to meet God in our Indigenous neighbours?

The candle flame that burns here represents the presence of Christ in a dark world. Let us honour that fire that burns within us, the longing for justice and healing.

 

Christmas Day: Bulletin Insert

On September 13, 2007 the UN General Assembly adopted the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. This followed more than twenty years of discussions within the UN system. Indigenous representatives played key roles in the development of this Declaration.

There are over 370 million Indigenous peoples in Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe and the Pacific. They are among the most impoverished, marginalised and frequently victimised people in the world

The United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples is celebrated globally as a symbol of triumph and hope. Effective implementation of the Declaration would result in significant improvements in the global situation of Indigenous peoples.

-Ad Hoc Coalition on the UN Declaration

The 46 Articles address specific violations committed against Indigenous communities and individuals. Each article reflects a painful reality for Indigenous people. Each article is a redress of an established wrong.

 

“The tragic and brutal story of what happened to us, especially at the hands of governments, is well known. ... But today, with the adoption of the Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples by the United Nations General Assembly, we see the opportunity for a new beginning, for another kind of relationship with States in North America and indeed throughout the world.”

-Statement of Indigenous Representatives from the North America Region, 13th September 2007.

Recognising that a historic opportunity exists for Christians in Canada and the US to support indigenous peacemakers, a vital, faithful and prophetic response is to call on the government to implement the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.

CANADA - Take action: http://www.kairoscanada.org/en/take-action/the-land-our-life/kairos-day-of-action-december-5/december-5th-beat-the-drum-action-update/

US - Take action:  http://takeaction.amnestyusa.org/siteapps/advocacy/index.aspx?c=jhKPIXPCIoE&b=2590179&template=x.ascx&action=14586