Stand with Masafer Yatta

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Interactive Report about Masafer Yatta

Masafer Yatta refers to an area of the South Hebron Hills in the West Bank which is home to 1800 people living in twelve villages. Eight of those villages (approx. 1000 people) face eviction by the Israeli government. Israel wants to use the area for military training and refers to the area as 'Firing Zone 918'. Our interactive report gives basic information about the area and the situation surrounding it. It also provides links to more information. Check it out! 

New expulsions Israeli military proposing for Jinba village residents as a "compromise."

 

South Hebron Hills Blog

Read updates about what is happening in the area from multiple NGOs working there. 

 

Links to resources and published articles:

Association for Civil Rights in Israel (ACRI) Fact Sheet

B'Tselem  Map and Background on Masafer Yatta and Firing Zone 918

Campaign for the Abolition of Firing Zone 918 in the South Hebron Hills

OCHA's Massafer Yatta Case Study

Haaretz | When a Palestinian home isn’t really a home (20 February 2013)

The Telegraph | Cave-dwelling Palestinian farmers facing eviction from homes

Haaretz | A Toxic Attachment

New York Times | Israel Seeks Army Use of West Bank Area (23 July 2012)

Haaretz |  Israel orders demolition of 8 Palestinian villages, claims need for IDF training land(23 July 2012)

B’tselem’s report about Firing Zone 918′s historical and legal events since its birth until 2004: â€śMeans of Expulsion: Violence, Harassment and Lawlessness against Palestinians”

OCHA’s report about firing areas all over the West Bank: http://bit.ly/1mH4DwQ

Defense Ministry submission to the Israeli High Court of Justice: the State Attorney submission to the Court

Firing Zone 918′s international Law violations, according to Professor Michael Bothe: http://bit.ly/1mH4NUM

 

CPT Participates in Peaceful demonstration

CPT participated in a peaceful march and bike ride to draw attention to and oppose the evictions in the Firing Zone. Read International Solidarity Movement's atricle about the demonstration here

Get Involved

Petition

Please read and sign our petition to the Israeli ambassador Here. Help us save these villages!  

Massafer Yatta Under Israeli Occupation

A video about the current situation and the possibilities of the area

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CPTnet Stories

MEDITERRANEAN: Mytilene Mayor reneges on promise to support Pipka welcome center for refugees; orders closure

 

 
 Meeting with Mayor Galenos

On 16 September, Christian Peacemaker Teams (CPT) Mediterranean’s partner, the civil society initiative, The Village of All Together, met with Spyros Galenos, the mayor of Mytilene, on the Island of Lesvos, Greece.  They wanted to enlist the support of the mayor and to address the repeated failures of the police, coastguard, and other authorities at the Moria Reception Center to register and release migrants efficiently and to provide for their basic needs.

In the week before, the police had not processed many people, but continued to bring migrants to Pikpa without providing sleeping materials, clothes, or medical care for them.  On Monday night, around 600 people were staying in Pikpa—a place intended for 80-100.  Many slept on the grass with no protection whatsoever.

CPT Mediterranean accompanied the members of Village of All Together to the meeting in the mayor’s office.

MEDITERRANEAN: How First Reception Centres treat migrants arriving in Greece

in:

 I spent a lot of time over several weeks talking with different groups of migrants who had spent at least a couple of nights at Moria, the first reception center located in Mytilene, Lesbos.  The conditions they described were not what I was expected from a first reception center, which is supposed to be a shelter for human beings running from wars, conflicts and persecutions.

“There is no shower.  They are broken and we could not use any of them,” one of the migrants said before leaving for Athens.

 â€śThe toilets are not working and we had to bring bucket water to flush manually after using them,” Masoumeh an Afghan woman said.  She had spent two nights in Moria with her family before traveling to Athens.

 â€śThe sewage is coming into the hallways and sometimes even into the rooms.  The beds were very dirty and so smelly,” Ali, an Afghan man who was in Moria for two nights with his family, said.

Moria First Reception Centre

Prayers for Peacemakers, September 17, 2014

Prayers for Peacemakers, September 17, 2014

Pray for the people of Iraq as the U.S. and its allies enlist the same military solutions for the violence currently afflicting the people of Iraq and Iraqi Kurdistan that gave rise to the violence in the first place. 

Epixel* for Sunday, September 21, 2014
                                    Refugees at the Erbil/Hawler Checkpoint, Iraqi Kurdistan
And should I not be concerned about Nineveh, that great city, in which there are more than a 
hundred and twenty thousand persons who do not know their right hand from their left, and 
also many animals?" Jonah 4:11
*epixel: a snapshot-epistle to the churches related to and appearing with a text from the upcoming Sunday's Revised Common 
Lectionary readings.

IRAQI KURDISTAN: Life goes on under a shadow

 

 
 Neighbors line up at bakery to buy bread

In the hot afternoon sun, two children dart into the small grocery store near our house and come out smiling with popsicles.  A woman responds to my greeting of “choni bashi?” as she fills up a bag of plums.  As the sun starts to drop closer to the horizon, clusters of boys are out on our street playing football (soccer).  Even though Kurdish and international forces are fighting the Islamic State (IS) two and a half hours away, life, in Iraqi Kurdistan, goes on.

A shadow, however, looms over the people in the Kurdish region of Iraq.  They feel it when they hear that the Kurdish Peshmerga forces have taken back towns on the edge of Mosul from the self-proclaimed Islamic State (IS, also called ISIS and DAASH) fighters.  But they also remember early August, when the Peshmerga had been protecting the city of Shangal (Sinjar) and the surrounding areas, but then withdrew from the area—claiming they had run out of ammunition.  The withdrawal allowed IS soldiers to come in and terrorize the Yazidi people.

Even though IS had been collaborating over the past years with some Sunni populations in Iraq, in their opposition to the oppressive actions of the al-Maliki government, it was the IS takeover of Mosul in June that made the world take notice.  Yet, it seemed that IS was moving toward Baghdad afterwards and not the northern Kurdish region, so the Kurds drew a deep breath.  Then, on 3 August, the front got a little closer when IS captured the Mosul Dam and the city of Sinjar.  Peshmerga forces responded with attempts to retake some captured towns on the edge of the Kurdish region.  But it came as a surprise, when, on 6 August, IS seized four strategic towns on a key highway and advanced to positions just minutes from Erbil, the capitol of the Kurdish Regional Government (KRG).

GREECE: Refugees' lives should not depend on miracles

in:

On 29 August 2014, I was sitting in the office  and busy with some daily task like email.  Usually in the early afternoon there is not too much to dooutside.  Nevertheless, incidents can happen at any time and part of the reason we are here on Lesvos is to be prepared to respond whenever we receive a call.  I got a phone call that a migrants’ boat had been turned over the night before, and one of the migrants was missing.

Migrants’ boats leave from the Turkish side of the Aegean Sea to the Greek islands almost every night after midnight.  The smugglers use small flimsy plastic boats for this kind of trip.  If there is a lot of wind and the weather is not friendly, incidents are more likely to happen and migrants drown or float on the water for hours until they get rescued.

“It was around 1:00 a.m. that we got on board and left the Turkish side; I do not remember exactly when the boat went upside-down but it was not a long time after we left, maybe half an hour,” one of the survivors, an Afghan man, told me as tears rolled down his face.  Sometimes migrants relive the tragic scenes that happen during their journey to Europe for many years.

Events

MEDITERRANEAN: Mytilene Mayor reneges on promise to support Pipka welcome center for refugees; orders closure

 

 
 Meeting with Mayor Galenos

On 16 September, Christian Peacemaker Teams (CPT) Mediterranean’s partner, the civil society initiative, The Village of All Together, met with Spyros Galenos, the mayor of Mytilene, on the Island of Lesvos, Greece.  They wanted to enlist the support of the mayor and to address the repeated failures of the police, coastguard, and other authorities at the Moria Reception Center to register and release migrants efficiently and to provide for their basic needs.

In the week before, the police had not processed many people, but continued to bring migrants to Pikpa without providing sleeping materials, clothes, or medical care for them.  On Monday night, around 600 people were staying in Pikpa—a place intended for 80-100.  Many slept on the grass with no protection whatsoever.

CPT Mediterranean accompanied the members of Village of All Together to the meeting in the mayor’s office.

MEDITERRANEAN: How First Reception Centres treat migrants arriving in Greece

in:

 I spent a lot of time over several weeks talking with different groups of migrants who had spent at least a couple of nights at Moria, the first reception center located in Mytilene, Lesbos.  The conditions they described were not what I was expected from a first reception center, which is supposed to be a shelter for human beings running from wars, conflicts and persecutions.

“There is no shower.  They are broken and we could not use any of them,” one of the migrants said before leaving for Athens.

 â€śThe toilets are not working and we had to bring bucket water to flush manually after using them,” Masoumeh an Afghan woman said.  She had spent two nights in Moria with her family before traveling to Athens.

 â€śThe sewage is coming into the hallways and sometimes even into the rooms.  The beds were very dirty and so smelly,” Ali, an Afghan man who was in Moria for two nights with his family, said.

Moria First Reception Centre

Prayers for Peacemakers, September 17, 2014

Prayers for Peacemakers, September 17, 2014

Pray for the people of Iraq as the U.S. and its allies enlist the same military solutions for the violence currently afflicting the people of Iraq and Iraqi Kurdistan that gave rise to the violence in the first place. 

Epixel* for Sunday, September 21, 2014
                                    Refugees at the Erbil/Hawler Checkpoint, Iraqi Kurdistan
And should I not be concerned about Nineveh, that great city, in which there are more than a 
hundred and twenty thousand persons who do not know their right hand from their left, and 
also many animals?" Jonah 4:11
*epixel: a snapshot-epistle to the churches related to and appearing with a text from the upcoming Sunday's Revised Common 
Lectionary readings.

IRAQI KURDISTAN: Life goes on under a shadow

 

 
 Neighbors line up at bakery to buy bread

In the hot afternoon sun, two children dart into the small grocery store near our house and come out smiling with popsicles.  A woman responds to my greeting of “choni bashi?” as she fills up a bag of plums.  As the sun starts to drop closer to the horizon, clusters of boys are out on our street playing football (soccer).  Even though Kurdish and international forces are fighting the Islamic State (IS) two and a half hours away, life, in Iraqi Kurdistan, goes on.

A shadow, however, looms over the people in the Kurdish region of Iraq.  They feel it when they hear that the Kurdish Peshmerga forces have taken back towns on the edge of Mosul from the self-proclaimed Islamic State (IS, also called ISIS and DAASH) fighters.  But they also remember early August, when the Peshmerga had been protecting the city of Shangal (Sinjar) and the surrounding areas, but then withdrew from the area—claiming they had run out of ammunition.  The withdrawal allowed IS soldiers to come in and terrorize the Yazidi people.

Even though IS had been collaborating over the past years with some Sunni populations in Iraq, in their opposition to the oppressive actions of the al-Maliki government, it was the IS takeover of Mosul in June that made the world take notice.  Yet, it seemed that IS was moving toward Baghdad afterwards and not the northern Kurdish region, so the Kurds drew a deep breath.  Then, on 3 August, the front got a little closer when IS captured the Mosul Dam and the city of Sinjar.  Peshmerga forces responded with attempts to retake some captured towns on the edge of the Kurdish region.  But it came as a surprise, when, on 6 August, IS seized four strategic towns on a key highway and advanced to positions just minutes from Erbil, the capitol of the Kurdish Regional Government (KRG).

GREECE: Refugees' lives should not depend on miracles

in:

On 29 August 2014, I was sitting in the office  and busy with some daily task like email.  Usually in the early afternoon there is not too much to dooutside.  Nevertheless, incidents can happen at any time and part of the reason we are here on Lesvos is to be prepared to respond whenever we receive a call.  I got a phone call that a migrants’ boat had been turned over the night before, and one of the migrants was missing.

Migrants’ boats leave from the Turkish side of the Aegean Sea to the Greek islands almost every night after midnight.  The smugglers use small flimsy plastic boats for this kind of trip.  If there is a lot of wind and the weather is not friendly, incidents are more likely to happen and migrants drown or float on the water for hours until they get rescued.

“It was around 1:00 a.m. that we got on board and left the Turkish side; I do not remember exactly when the boat went upside-down but it was not a long time after we left, maybe half an hour,” one of the survivors, an Afghan man, told me as tears rolled down his face.  Sometimes migrants relive the tragic scenes that happen during their journey to Europe for many years.