al-Khalil (Hebron)

CPT INTERNATIONAL: Train with CPT – Join CPT’s Peacemaker Corps

CPTnet
March 2, 2017
CPT INTERNATIONAL: Train with CPT – Join CPT’s Peacemaker Corps 

 

 

Christian Peacemaker Teams (CPT) is currently accepting applications for its Peacemaker Corps.  Join us in building partnerships to transform violence and oppression!  

Applicants must be 21 years of age or older and have completed, or plan to complete, a short-term CPT Delegation or internship.  Qualified applicants may be invited to participate in CPT’s intensive, month-long training from 13 July – 13 August 2017 in Chicago, Illinois USA where membership in the Peacemaker Corps is discerned.  Trained Peacemaker Corps members are then eligible to apply for open positions on CPT teams.  

CPT builds partnerships to transform violence and oppression in situations of lethal conflict around the world.  We are committed to work and relationships that: 1) honor and reflect the presence of faith and spirituality, 2) strengthen grassroots initiatives, 3) transform structures of domination and oppression, and 4) embody creative nonviolence and liberating love. 

CPT understands violence to be rooted in systemic structures of oppression.  We are committed to undoing oppressions within our own lives and in the policies and practices of our organization.   

CPT is a Christian-identified organization with multi-faith/spiritually diverse membership.  We seek individuals who are capable, responsible and rooted in faith/spirituality to work for peace as members of violence-reduction teams trained in the disciplines of nonviolence.  We are committed to building a Peacemaker Corps that reflects the rich diversity of the human family in ability, age, class, ethnicity, gender identity, language, national origin, race and sexual orientation. 

APPLICATION DEADLINE: 15 March 2017; direct any questions and send complete application to personnel@cpt.org.

AL-KHALIL (HEBRON): CPT Palestine August 2017 Newsletter- Why do you keep going back?, Restricted Movement and More...

 
 
Why do you keep going back?

At the end of August, Israeli Defence Minister Avigdor Liberman announced that the Israeli Military will be issuing an order that gives official status to the Hebron municipal committee, which represents settlers occupying Palestinian land in the city of Hebron. This action not only violates the Oslo Accords and the 1997 Hebron Protocol, but also international law and means further colonization of H2. Read More

Restricted Movement

CPT team was recently invited to attend a meeting in Ramallah. As a team, we took a Palestinian service taxi, an orange van which holds seven passengers, to Ramallah from Hebron. On our way to Ramallah, Palestinians in the taxi put their seatbelts on before we left the Palestinian streets of Hebron, as it is law for Palestinians to wear a seatbelt on an Israeli road. Just as the taxi was going to pass an Israeli checkpoint, an Israeli police officer pulled the taxi aside. Four of the passengers in the taxi, including a CPTer, were not wearing a seatbelt when the taxi was pulled over. Once the taxi was parked by the checkpoint, the Israeli police officer opened the van door, asked for everyone’s IDs and inspected to see who was wearing a seatbelt. The police officer seized almost everyone’s ID except for my passport and my fellow CPTer’s passport. Read more...

 

Behind the Barricade

A new brigade, the Givati, have recently come to the Old City of Hebron to carry out Israel’s military occupation of Palestine. Last Wednesday, the Givati’s military presence was asserted when they arrested three Palestinian boys, ages thirteen to fourteen. As a matter of reference, Israeli soldiers are able to imprison Palestinian boys as adults once they reach the age of twelve years old, whereas Israelis cannot be imprisoned as adults until they are eighteen years old. Shortly after the aforementioned arrests, the Israeli soldiers established a human barricade, spanning more than three hundred yards, preventing Palestinians from walking and driving through the main streets of the Old City. Palestinian storekeepers were forced to close shops and soldiers conducted multiple ID checks. This detainment lasted for a couple of hours until soldiers went back to their military base, satisfied with the work they accomplished. Read more...

PALESTINE/COLOMBIA REFLECTION: Made in the USA -- Take action to stop military aid

CPTnet
11 September 2017
PALESTINE/COLOMBIA REFLECTION: Made in the USA -- Take action to stop military aid

by Hannah Redekop

Lucas lay on the ground gasping for air, while his community frantically gathered around him, fanning his body and cracking open coconuts with hopes that the sweet water would revive him.  Moments earlier, on that day in June 2014, the Colombian riot police (ESMAD) had forced their way onto Guayabo farmland under illegal orders to evict the small farming community living on the banks of the Magdalena River.  The community had gathered in a line, hands held tight, to peacefully resist the takeover. ESMAD violently beat back several campesino farmers and then fired half a dozen tear gas canisters to disperse the community. Lucas, having inhaled the toxic chemical, had passed out while struggling to breathe.

Campesino man blocks the gate from riot police          A campesino blocks the entry to the farm during the June 2014 eviction in El Guayabo. Photo: Luca Zanetti

AL-KHALIL (HEBRON) A week in photos August 30 - September 5

A week of occupation in photos: Click photos for links 
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Through Family Streets

 
Pictured here: Israeli soldiers and Border Police making a barricade around Israeli settlers and Zionists as they participate in a settler incursion while Palestinian families look on. This last week, the speaker for the settler incursion guided the tour through a new route, a route through Palestinian yards as families ate dinner. At least thirty soldiers and Border Police, and as many Zionists, walked through Palestinian families' homes during the incursion. 

(02/09/2017)

AL-KHALIL (HEBRON) A week in photos August 22-29


 

"End the Segregation" 

 
Pictured here: Palestinians living in the neighborhood of Ghaith next to Mafia Checkpoint gathered to demonstrate against the fence and lockable gate that was erected in June 2017, separating them from other Palestinian neighborhoods and a road that only allows Isreali settlers to walk on. Dozens of adults and children gathered for this demonstration, singing songs and chanting for an end to the occupation. As soon as the demonstration began, dozens of Israeli soldiers and Border Police gathered outside the fenced area photographing the participants who were mostly children. The Israeli military forced the press to get behind a police barrier to prevent them from photographing the demonstration. Israeli settlers also came to the area in an attempt to disrupt the demonstration. 

(28/08/2017)

AL-KHALIL (HEBRON) A week in photos August 2-8

 

Occupied Bodies 

 
Pictured here:  The violation of a body search is commonplace under occupation here in Hebron. After settlers had attacked Palestinians with stones, this Palestinian teenager was stopped and searched arbitrarily by Israeli soldiers. As is frequent, he was forced to pull up his top, spin around and wait by a wall until he was allowed to walk past.

(04/08/2017)

AL-KHALIL (HEBRON) A week in photos July 25- August 1

 

Hebron Settlers Occupy Palestinian Home

 
Pictured here: Israeli settlers supported by Israeli soldiers, Border Police and Israeli Police illegally entered a home owned by the Abu Rajab family which is close to the Ibrahimi Mosque and next to  Al Fayhaa girls school in Al Khalil (Hebron)  Read more. Settlers have been evicted on two previous occasions, the last time being in 2015 when they failed to show the Israeli Civil Administration proof of ownership.  If the settlers are successful in this attempt to take permanent possession of the house it will almost create a complete encirclement of the Old City of Al Khalil by settlements.
A Palestinian family of sixteen which includes eight children under fifteen years live on two floors of the building and have been subjected to violence whilst trying to move in and out of their home. The area was declared a Closed Military Zone and at this time it is not known if that order has been lifted.


(July 25, 2017)

PALESTINE: What would you risk for peace?

CPTnet

31 July 2017

PALESTINE: What would you risk for peace?

by Rachelle Friesen 

In April 2017, more than 1,600 Palestinian political prisoners went on a hunger strike. As I write this article, strikers have refused food and have been drinking only salt water for the last 31 days. They are protesting being held without charge or trial, medical negligence, poor treatment and the lack of family visits. The strikers are putting their bodies at risk to nonviolently protest their treatment; many are experiencing severe fatigue, malnutrition and dizziness.

Throughout Palestine, people are rising up in support of the hunger strike. Nonviolent resistance to the policies of occupation are not new. When I lived and worked in Palestine with Mennonite Central Committee, part of my job was to accompany and support the nonviolent resistance. Every week, activists would protest against the separation barrier in various villages around the West Bank, and every week those same activists were faced with violent repression from the Israeli military, who used tear gas, sound bombs, rubber-coated-steel bullets, live ammunition and beatings by soldiers. 

While putting their bodies in danger, they also risked arrest. At the Nakba demonstration in 2015, Mazzen Al Azzah, a friend and nonviolent activist, was arrested. When he was released, it was on the condition that he would not attend any more demonstrations. When I asked him what he was going to do, his response was, “I will go. I am not afraid. This is part of the struggle.”

Palestinian man

AL-KHALIL (HEBRON) A week in photos July 18-24

A week of occupation in photos: July 18 - July 24
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"Day of Rage"

Pictured here: Two Red Cresent Society ambulances wait to transfer injured to hospitals as clashes erupted across the occupied West Bank on the Day of RageJuly 21, 2017.  Palestinians are protesting new Israeli security measures at the Temple Mount/Haram al-Sharif complex. In Hebron, Palestinians gathered at the Hussein Stadium for Friday prayer. Following prayer, CPT witnessed clashes that erupted from Bab al-Zawiya, and reached the area of the Hebron governmental hospital. CPT observed Israeli soldiers who took over the roof tops of several Palestinian homes and turned them into temporary military posts, where the soldiers shot tear-gas, rubber-coated bullets, and live ammunition at Palestinians.
 
 (July 21, 2017)

AL-KHALIL (HEBRON) A week in photos July 11-17

A week of occupation in photos: July 11 - July 17
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Prayers Controlled 

Pictured here: Several Palestinian women, children, and men wait to be allowed access through a checkpoint that leads to al-Ibrahimi Mosque for Friday noon prayers in al-Khalil. Many seeking to pass through were subject to body searches, ID checks, and bag searches, typical of the control Israeli Occupying Forces (IOF) have over the Old City and al-Ibrahimi Mosque. Though Palestinians experience this control every week, tensions were particularly high due to the events in Jerusalem earlier that morning: three Palestinian men and two Israeli Police officers had been killed at the al-Aqsa Mosque, resulting in Israeli forces closing the al-Aqsa compound for Friday prayers and thousands of Palestinians being denied entry to pray. Al-Aqsa was not reopened until Sunday, and only with the addition of metal detectors at the gates and much of the Old City in Jerusalem still closed. Many Palestinians responded by refusing to enter through the metal detectors and praying in the streets instead. 

(July 14, 2017)